Mental Health 10% Discount 

April 27, 2021

The Most Affordable Way to Improve Your Mental Health

The Coronavirus outbreak doesn’t only cripple millions of lives financially and physically, but it also affects many people’s mental health. It doesn’t spare anyone regardless of race, caste, class, gender, age, or nationality. It instantly became the world's common enemy—a silent and invisible enemy that will attack you when you least expect it, especially if you're not following health and safety protocols.

That's how lethal and nerve-wracking this contagious virus is. Not to mention the impact it has had on the mind, making many paranoid and anxious. It has caused hopelessness for those who have lost their livelihoods. Those who have lost their loved ones to the virus are still grieving. But how can you properly grieve when you couldn’t have a proper farewell for your departed loved one? These are just a few of the reasons why deteriorating mental health is becoming a silent epidemic affecting millions of lives worldwide. .

Fortunately, there is an inexpensive way to boost someone's mental health. It is cheaper than any medication and therapy, which may cost you hundreds or thousands of dollars. What is it? The act of passing kindness onto others. It may be as simple as walking your neighbor's dog, leaving unused quarters at the laundromat, or giving away mental health awareness t-shirts to those who need to uplift their spirits. But is it effective? Let's find out in this article.

What is the effect of the pandemic on someone's mental health?

Problems At Work. Black businessman feeling upset and desperate, working at office, hands on head. Free space

Imagine that you're living your life to the fullest, or that you're one of the lucky people who can get by day to day. You have a stable job, or you're doing well in school. You look forward to the weekends because this is when you hang out with your family and friends. You never miss any important holidays or birthdays because they mean instant family reunions. Paydays are synonymous with indulging yourself with a new shirt, trying out a new dish, or traveling to an unknown destination. Every morning you make time to walk your dog or jog at a nearby park.

Then the Coronavirus epidemic happens.

All of these things are "taken away" from you in a snap because of mandatory stay-at-home orders. Your movement is limited to buying essential goods. Your daily trip to the grocery store is now filled with dread because you're worried that you may catch the virus and spread it to your family on your way back home.

Social gatherings are prohibited. Recreational activities like traveling, shopping, partying, hiking, and any public outings aren’t allowed. Business establishments and schools are closed. Added to your list of concerns is job stability because other companies are cutting jobs or, worse, filing bankruptcy. It happened to them, so there is a possibility that it may happen to you too.

This chaos is happening worldwide, and no one is spared. It is unimaginable how a virus that is smaller than a human hair can do all this to us. It is like living in a post-apocalyptic world, where only the fittest can survive.

But how can you survive if everything is happening all at once? You want to do something about it, but the looming threat of a deadly and contagious virus is limiting all of your movements. One wrong move and it’s checkmate.

No data is needed to show just how impactful the COVID-19 pandemic is to mental health and well-being as you've probably witnessed and experienced the nightmare yourself.

How can performing some random acts of kindness save your mental health?

Single parenthood. Mother and daughter spending time together at home.

As the saying goes, "Doing good does you good." The feeling of goodness you get is the same for the recipient of the kind gesture. If you're still skeptical about the health benefits of altruism and how much you can do, don't worry because kindness is teachable. According to Dr. Ritchie Davidson of the University of Wisconsin:

"It's kind of like weight training; we found that people can actually build up their compassion 'muscle' and respond to others' suffering with care and a desire to help."

The researchers at the University of Oxford conducted a sort of kindness training or experiment. They analyzed the psychological effects of seven-day kindness activities. What is the result? The study concludes:

"...that performing kindness activities for seven days increases happiness. In addition, we report a positive correlation between the number of kind acts and increases in happiness. Neither effect differed across the experimental groups, suggesting that kindness to strong ties, to weak ties, and to self, as well as observing acts of kindness, have equally positive effects on happiness."

Besides happiness, here are other benefits of performing, receiving, and observing acts of kindness, as enumerated by Dartmouth College in New Hampshire, United States:

  • It increases oxytocin, also known as the "love hormone." This is the hormone that helps lower blood pressure and improves heart health.
  • Givers of kindness felt calmer and less depressed. It also aids in increasing feelings of self-worth.
  • Givers experience the phenomenon called "helper's high." When you help another person, your brain's pleasure and reward centers light up. It is as if you're the recipient and not the helper.
  • It triggers serotonin production, which is the "feel-good hormone." Serotonin helps calm you and even will make you happier.
  • Being kind to others produces endorphins and decreases the production of cortisol.. Endorphins are known as a natural painkiller, whereas cortisol is the stress hormone.

What's more, you don't have to spend hundreds or thousands of dollars to get all of the health benefits outlined above. All you need to do is be kind to others.

Random Acts of Kindness Ideas

Here are fun ways to perform acts of kindness even when you're on a budget:

Attractive waitress laughing at African American man funny joke, serving customers, diverse couple making order in cafe, coffeehouse female worker and multiracial visitors having fun

Practice "the waiter rule"

In other words, be considerate and grateful to your server. It is as simple as making eye contact and smiling at them while they're serving you. If you’re feeling extremely generous, try leaving a big tip on the table.

Share your knowledge in online forums

This is the easiest way to reach out and help people worldwide. Join an online community that you enjoy or one that interests you. Answer questions, give feedback, or "like" the content of others. In this way, you will make members feel supported and appreciated even if you're miles away from each other.

Never being alone. Side view of smiling young female spend time at home look on phone screen having date online. Millennial woman chat on cell read message email from friend write answer in good mood

Text someone good morning or good night

This is relatively trivial, but sometimes we forget to do it because of our busy lives. Those two short phrases are enough to let someone know that you're thinking about them.

Young female volunteer in mask gives an elderly man boxes with food near his house. Quarantined, isolated. Coronavirus covid-19. Donation

Send a care package to someone

Do you know someone whose bank account is a bit strapped right now? Fill a box with essentials or random things that the recipient wants like healthy snacks, chocolates, stress relief candles, bagels, relaxation kits, or mental health awareness clothing. Bridge the social distance through these thoughtful care packages.

Ship mental health awareness t-shirts

Since we still need to physically distance ourselves from our loved ones and friends, you can still boost their mood by ordering shirts for mental health awareness and sending them directly to their addresses. These mental health awareness t-shirts have messages such as "you are worthy," "focus on the good," and "treat yourself with kindness." 

In closing

Performing random acts of kindness is a surefire and affordable way to improve one's mental health and well-being. Make a positive difference through sending a letter, running errands, calling a friend, leaving a box of doughnuts, or sending mental health awareness t-shirts. When you're kind to others, you're also kind to yourself in return. Your kindness helps make the world a happier place.

Kindness is contagious, so infect everyone with it! It is more viral and powerful than the invisible enemy we're up against. Together we can make a better world for all.

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We’re a global team of like-minded individuals who dream of giving back to the community. We created Kindness Culture as a way to fulfill our mission of empowering and inspiring people through design, while also being able to donate directly to charity.
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